Research

Creative Industries Research

I have carried out feasibility studies, scoping projects and surveys for the British Film Institute, the Department for Enterprise, Trade and Industry, the International Fund for Ireland, the Northern Ireland Film Commission, Northern Ireland Screen and Skillset.

Subjects have included industry training, issues of diversity, archival practices, film studios and career paths and utilised both qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

More recently I have provided consultation to the East Anglian Film Archive, Northern Film and Media and the Yorkshire Film Archive on developing digital media projects, particularly concept development, building strategic partnerships and ensuring the success of funding applications.

 

Doctoral Research

My research examined the impact of new media technologies on interaction, focusing on pervasive experiences. It explored what happens when participants engage in mediated gameplay activity within a live setting. It considered the relationship between pervasiveness and narrative, framing, media as 'an extension of man', post-humanism, agency and interactive dramaturgy.

It hypothesised that simultaneous engagement in multiple situations of co-presence leads to a new state of being, termed 'co-co-presence', in which what happens in one situation pervades another. It reported on a series of small-scale iterative experiments, using a specially designed pervasive game devised to engender co-co-presence and isolate selected variables in controlled conditions. The experiments compared the experience of new media technology (texting) with old media (paper notes) and found no significant difference in either the creation of, or effects of, co-co-presence.

The evidence from these experiments suggested that what happened in the game (one situation of co-presence) affected what happened outside the game (another situation of co-presence) and vice-versa, confirming the hypothesis. The data also showed that social framing factors had the greatest influence on participant behaviour.

In conclusion, this study found that engaging in multiple states of co-presence, or 'co-co-presence', did create pervasive effects although that pervasiveness was not dependent on the use of new media technologies.